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Our neighboring galaxy has a violent history, and it is on its way to devour our Milky Way

    Our neighboring galaxy has a violent history, and it is on its way to devour our Milky Way

    • 2020-11-23 02:39:11
    • 60
    Our neighboring galaxy has a violent history, and it is on its way to devour our Milky Way

    The Milky Way is on the way to extinction by a violent cosmic action, and thus its fate will be like that of many galaxies over billions of years, according to astronomers.
    Astronomers have said that the gigantic and vast Andromeda galaxy, adjacent to our galaxy, has a "violent" past, and it will end up devouring our own galaxy, the Milky Way.
    After collecting the violent history of the Andromeda galaxy, the scientists explained that the strong and violent past of the galaxy was marked by voracity as it devoured several smaller galaxies, as they found the remnants and remnants of those small galaxies flowing and lost between the stars.
    According to scientists, this path is what Andromeda has followed over the next few billions of years, and will continue all the way to the Milky Way after about 4 billion more years.
    They noted that Andromeda has devoured smaller galaxies for about 10 billion years, and that faint traces of the decimated galaxies can still be seen to this day.
    Astronomers hope that the research, published in Nature, will shed light on how our galaxy will eventually swallow up and how it will end, but it also reveals new mysteries about why and how Andromeda devoured the galaxies that surround it.


    "The Milky Way has been on a collision course with Andromeda for about 4 billion years, so knowing what kind of monster our galaxy is facing is useful in discovering the final fate of the Milky Way," said Douglas Mackie, professor at the Australian National University Research Center.
    "Andromeda has a much larger and more complex star halo than the Milky Way, which indicates that it has dismantled many galaxies, and perhaps even larger ones," Mackie added.
    "By tracking the faint remnants of these smaller, perishing galaxies with clusters of decaying stars, we were able to recreate the way Andromeda arose," Mackie said.
    While the study may help answer important questions about the fate of our galaxy, it also opens up new questions and secrets.